Archives

A selection of articles on culture, history, food and travel from the pages of Cornucopia. Subscribe now, to receive the next issue straight to your door!

  • The Empire Unvarnished

    From Issue 53

    Luigi Mayer made his mark with lively, quirky scenes for the British ambassador to Constantinople, painting viziers and villagers, soldiers and servants across the Ottoman Empire. He deserves to be plucked from obscurity, argues Briony Llewellyn

  • Parallel Lives

    From Issue 27

    Both were ambitious men with a penchant for poetry who suffered extremes of fortune. David Barchard charts the ties between two dominant figures in nineteenth-century Turkey, the British Ambassador Stratford Canning, and the Ottoman sultan Mahmut II

  • Terrifying Beauty

    From Issue 50

    Justinian’s soaring edifice inspires the same awe today as it did in visitors a millennium ago who wondered if this were Heaven or Earth. Setting out on a tour of the city’s best-preserved Byzantine churches, Robert Ousterhout still senses an air of the miraculous in Ayasofya

  • Good Vibrations

    From Issue 43

    Thanks to the musicologist and luthier Fikret Karakaya, our 21st-century ears can now enjoy the long-lost sounds of early Ottoman music. His quest to revive these authentic sounds has been lengthy and painstaking – not least because he had to reinvent the instruments, then learn to play them. By Caterina Scaramelli. Photographs by Fritz von der Schulenburg

  • The Stones of Sürmene

    From Issue 34

    Michael Meeker sets out to decipher the architecture of a forgotten Black Sea stronghold

  • Off the eaten track: Konya

    From Issue 34

    Charles Perry, Arabist and food historian, continues his travels along the highways and byways of Turkey’s culinary past. In Konya he is invited to a traditional wedding feast – rice with everything

  • The Story of the Kirghiz

    From Issue 33

    The Kirghiz are a semi-nomadic Turki-speaking people from the old Turkistan borderlands of China, old Russia and Afghanistan. Stalin, in a spirit of divide et impera, drew the borders of Kyrgyzstan, as he did with the other Soviet Central Asian republics, right across the ethnic divides, scattering the Kirghiz between Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Kazakhstan.

  • Byzantium: Mystery and Imagination

    From Issue 32

    Not all Byzantium is buried: in addition to its twenty-odd surviving churches and sundry ruined palaces and fortifications, if you look around any grand imperial mosque, you will inevitably find columns, capitals and other marbles borrowed from its Byzantine predecessor. Robert Ousterhout investigates.

  • Shopping

    From Issue 32

    Shopping has superficial connotations, but to set off into this city on a shopping expedition is to explore its culture in the most profound and fruitful way. Elizabeth Meath Baker provides an overview.

  • The New Istanbul

    From Issue 32

    Past capital of empires, and heir to an uninterrupted urban tradition that stretches back millennia, Istanbul is all the tourist posters claim. Andrew Finkel traces its history.

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