Extract

Shepherd’s Delight

Berrin Torolsan on the wonders of white cheese

The age-old ambrosia of nomadic herdsmen, there is still nothing to beat a really good white cheese made from fresh ewe’s milk. Silky-textured, yet firm and piquant, it is ideal at breakfast with olives or with a glass of raki at the end of the day – and brilliant for cooking

One April evening in 2010 some friends who had invited us to dinner kindly sent their boat to collect us and our guest, the illustrious restaurateur Michel Roux Sr, who was curious to find out what was cooking on the Bosphorus. I was armed with a faded copy of At Home with the Roux Brothers, ready to be signed, but it was going to be drinks time as we sailed past the yalıs into the sunset, and I was in a mild panic as to what to offer him during our short voyage. What manner of exotic meze might he expect? In the end we kept it simple: an aperitif of chilled rakı to stimulate the appetite, and a meze of sele zeytini (a delicacy of olives left to ripen and shrivel on the branch, then placed under weights in baskets to sweeten) with beyaz peynir from Ezine on the Aegean, a silky, slightly piquant white cheese. To our minds, a trio of simple but sublime tastes, but what would foreign taste buds make of such novelties?…

To read the full article, purchase Issue 59

Issue 59, June 2019 Behind Closed Doors
£12.00 / $15.06 / 84.60 TL
Other Highlights from Cornucopia 59
  • Charmer Chameleon

    Described by his friend the novelist William Makepeace Thackeray as ‘a languid Lotus-eater’, the Victorian Orientalist JF Lewis travelled to Turkey and Egypt and recreated what he saw of Ottoman life in loving, exotic detail – often painting himself and his wife into his pictures clad in elaborate local dress. Briony Llewellyn looks back over a life of many colours

  • The Oldest Temple on Earth?

    Six millennia before Stonehenge, the dawn of the agrarian revolution came to the now arid Anatolian steppe – and with it came Göbekli Tepe, perhaps the first place of worship built by man. With its T-shaped columns and menacing animal carvings, it is an unacknowledged wonder of the ancient world. But who built it? And what went on here? By Barnaby Rogerson


  • Secret Chambers of the Black Eunuchs

    As the Topkapi prepares to open up parts of the palace long kept hidden, we recall the time Cornucopia was granted rare access to what remains the most secret section of all – the quarters of the Black Agas. These powerful African eunuchs guarded the Harem and controlled the finances of the hugely wealthy Queen Mother. Text by Berrin Torolsan. Photographs by Fritz von der Schulenburg


  • Eye of the Beholder

    Yildiz Moran abandoned photography for lexicography at the age of 30. But her decade behind the lens left an astonishing body of work, celebrated this year at Istanbul Modern. By Jamie Leptien


  • Adventures in the Wild, Wild East

    Robert Ousterhout spies the wonders of Anatolia through the eyes of early Western travellers

  • A room of his own

    ‘How my grandfather took Iznik to Yorkshire’ by Christopher Simon Sykes



  • The road to ruins

    Francis Russell drives the highways and byways of Rough Cilicia

Buy the issue
Issue 59, June 2019 Behind Closed Doors
£12.00 / $15.06 / 84.60 TL