Extract

Home is where the yurt is

Out of sight of the sea, high above Göcek Marina at Huzur Yadisi, another green peace prevails. In a hidden valley, Richard Tredennick-Titchen found an encampment of yurts that dramatically changed his life. Photographs by Sigurd Kranendonk

It was pitch black, and from the coastal village of Göçek we had just driven 2000 feet up a rough mountain track. When the minibus eventually stopped, we appeared to be in the middle of a valley with no signs of civilisation. But appearances were deceptive. Hidden within an olive grove were a number of yurts, traditional nomadic tents (yurt also means “home” in Turkish) clustered around a beautiful stone swimming pool. We had arrived at Huzur Vadisi (“Peaceful Valley”), one of the most imaginative alternative holiday centres in Turkey.

Huzur Vadisi, Gökçeovacık, Gökçek, 48310 Fethiye. www.huzurvadisi.com for details

To read the full article, purchase Issue 15

Issue 15, 1998 Mountain Secrets
£12.00 / $15.30 / 81.40 TL
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Buy the issue
Issue 15, 1998 Mountain Secrets
£12.00 / $15.30 / 81.40 TL
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