Extract

A Day on Black Rock Pasture

By whatever name it is known – whether Karataş Yayla (Black Rock Pasture) or Çağrankaya (Singing Rock) – this spur of the Kaçkars is full of drama. Andrew Byfield battled rain and fog to reach its riches

The temptation simply got the better of me. I was heading south on the road from Of to İspir with a party of nature lovers.

Along with Kate Clow, my role was that of co-leader of the party, and our notes from Greentours HQ instructed us to head up towards Ovit Pass on search of blackcock and salamanders – not an overly exciting prospect for a botanist! But as we approached the village of İkizdere our minibus passed the turning for Çağrankaya Yayla, or Karataş yayla, as it used to be known.

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Issue 42, 2009 Adventures in Anatolia
£8.00 / $10.41 / 36.76 TL
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Other Highlights from Cornucopia 42
  • Four Walks in the Kaçkars

    Kate Clow, pioneering waymarker and author of two walking guides to the Taurus Mountains, has now created a guide to trekking in the Kaçkars. Here she describes four breathtaking one-day walks.

  • Wrestling with Life in the Mountains

    High in the apparently empty Kaçkars, the way of life is as old as the hills. Michael Hornsby joins in the fun at a village festival in remote summer pastures. Photographs by Giulio Rubino

  • A Cold, Harsh Reality

    Norman Stone unravels the history of Kars

  • Portrait of the Artists

    Unlocking the door to the private world of Feyhaman and Güzin Duran, by Maureen Freely

  • The Flutterby Ball

    The Kaçkar Mountains are heaven for butterflies, as the butterfly book author and photographer Ahmet Baytaş, economist by trade, ecologist by nature, discovered when he returned to Yaylalar, the village of his birth

  • Mother of the Uighurs

    The Turkic Uighurs of Western China have long chafed under Communist Chinese rule. Christian Tyler meets their formidable figurehead, Rebiya Kadeer, who spent five years in prison for protesting against her people’s treatment and now carries on her fight for their freedom from Washington

  • Water Over the Bridge

    For the English-speaking community of Istanbul the suggestion of aqueduct-hunting in Thrace strikes fear into the hearts of all but the foolhardy. Relentlessly cheerful, Prof James Crow of Edinburgh University would laugh off each misadventure and forge onward.

  • Gorgeous Georgian

    Robert Ousterhout is agog at the remarkable Georgian churches of the Tao-Klarjeti, the two medieval Georgian principalities between Kars and the Kaçkars

  • Heat and Dust

    Leo Gough grew up in the hothouse atmosphere of Cold War Ankara, where his father was director of the British Institute of Archaeology. He recalls tales of derring-do from the larger-than-life visitors and scholars who passed through the institute’s doors

Buy the issue
Issue 42, 2009 Adventures in Anatolia
£8.00 / $10.41 / 36.76 TL
£4.80 / $6.24 / 22.06 TL