Extract

A Seriously Magnum Opus

Ottoman Architecture
by Doğan Kuban
the Antique Collectors' Club


  • Beyazit Mosque, Istanbul, 1500–05

The publication of a book that covers the six centuries and more of Ottoman architectural history ought always to be a significane event. The appearance of the English edition of Doğan Kuban’s Ottoman Architecture lives up to this expectation. The work is truly massive, with 719 pages and over one thousand illustrations, including many superb photographs by Cemal Emden. It is a great pleasure to leaf through its pages, although this can only be done when the book is resting on a table, as it weighs some nine pounds (more than four kilograms).

Tim Stanley is Senior Curator for the Middle East at the Victoria and Albert Museum

To read the full article, purchase Issue 48

Issue 48, Autumn 2012 Rural Treasures
£10.00 / $12.86 / 70.26 TL
Other Highlights from Cornucopia 48
  • Socialite, Traveller, Scholar, Spy…

    The Istanbul diaries of Gertrude Bell, now available online, reveal her astonishing transformation from socialite to scholar and political observer. By Robert Ousterhout

  • Pomp and Perfidy

    As Turkey and the Netherlands celebrate 400 years of diplomatic relations, Henk Boom highlights the twenty turbulent years that Frederik Gijsbert, Baron van Dedem spent as ambassador to Constantinople


  • Simply Sufi

    Simple on the outside, some wooden village mosques had an added portico reminiscent of galleries opening onto the courtyards of private houses in the region. Inside, pillared halls and colourful painting on the wooden structure and on the walls make for a warm, joyful space. Photographs by Tarkan Kutlu


  • Sanctuary of the Sultans

    Abdülhamid I and Osman III’s private quarters in the Topkapı. Photographed by Fritz von der Schulenburg


  • The Man who Rescued Hadrian

    Sagalassos, the remote site in southern Turkey where a giant statue of Emperor Hadrian was discovered five years ago, is the driving passion of Marc Waelkens. The Belgian archaeologist, whose new book is now available from Cornucopia, talks to Thomas Roueché about his pioneering work as director of excavations

  • Fruit of the Gods

    The best table grapes in Istanbul are the fragrant, delicate skinned çavuş from the northern Aegean island of Bozcaada, ancient Tenedos, and the sweet sultaniye grapes from around Izmir.



  • Muted World

    Maggie Quigley-Pınar describes a book of photographs that evoke the spirit an almost-forgotten modern era: Istanbul in the 1970s

  • The Diving Diva

    John Carswell pays tribute to his friend Honor Frost, doyenne of underwater archaeology


  • The Flow of Time

    James Crow on Istanbul’s amazing system of aqueducts


  • Harem Secrets

    The landmark 2012 exhibition at the Tokpapı Palace, and the sumptuous book that accompanied it.


  • A Brave New World

    They were stigmatised and despised, and eventually they were closed down. But what would Turkey be today without the Village Institutes, its bravest educational revolution, and the young people they empowered? Maureen Freely tells the moving story of the institutes, the subject of a new book and exhibition

  • Clerical Error

    The lethal mischief of Canon MacColl, by David Barchard



Buy the Book
Buy the issue
Issue 48, Autumn 2012 Rural Treasures
£10.00 / $12.86 / 70.26 TL
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