Rewarding reads: February 2017

Celebrities in Cappadocia, prefab chalets and poorly puppies

By Emma Harper | March 18, 2017


In this blog series, we highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that we’ve read over the past month. ‘I never thought I’d be saying this, but I’m a big fan of Martha Stewart’, writes Robert Ousterhout in a delightful post for the Penn History of Art...
Posted in Architecture, Books, History, Literature, Music and Performing Arts, News

Looking back from London

The Book Fair returns to the classics

By Roger Williams | March 14, 2017


The London Book Fair opened today with Poland as the ‘Market Focus’ country, and trade looked brisk. The behemoth publishing houses occupied centre stage with vast stands and clients checking in for their appointment. Better to wander around the edge of Olympia’s Exhibition Halls to find publishers less susceptible to...
Posted in Books, News, Shopping

Istanbul galleries sweep into Dubai

The 11th edition of Art Dubai opens on March 15

By Emma Harper | March 9, 2017


Three Istanbul galleries – Galerist, Galeri Zilberman and Sanatorium – will participate in the 11th edition of Art Dubai, an international art fair highlighting works from the Middle East, Africa and South Asia. Under the leadership of its new director, Myrna Ayad, the fair is presenting its strongest programme to...
Posted in Contemporary Art, Modern Art, News

Sounding off

Cevdet Erek prepares his site-specific sound installation for the 57th Venice Biennale

By Emma Harper | March 2, 2017


Even though Istanbul is one of the worst cities in the world for noise pollution, the sounds of the city are as much of a joy as they are a nuisance – they evoke a sense of place. Istanbul would not be Istanbul without the long, low horns of container...
Posted in Contemporary Art, Exhibitions, News

Rewarding reads: January 2017

Magical snow, sweet-and-sour pomegranate molasses and Turkish fairy tales

By Emma Harper | February 22, 2017


In this blog series, we highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that weve read over the past month. ‘Snow in Istanbul always feels magical,’ writes Tim Arango in The New York Times. He documents how last month’s blizzard, the heaviest snowfall in Istanbul since 2009, came as...
Posted in Books, Culinary Arts, History, News, Orientalism, Travel

Demolition by night

The historic Karaköy Passenger Terminal is the latest victim of the Galataport project

By Emma Harper | February 17, 2017


The photos and footage shared on Thursday night by Facebook user Togan Tong were grainy but unmistakable: the Karaköy Yolcu Salonu (Passenger Terminal), an important work of Turkish architecture from the early Republican era, was being torn down. The online newspaper Diken reports that the sea-facing side of the terminal...
Posted in Architecture, News

A parade of poets

Submissions for the 9th Nâzim Hikmet Poetry Competition due January 15

By Emma Harper | January 10, 2017


Calling all poets: the 9th Nâzim Hikmet Poetry Competition, organised as a tribute to the pre-eminent Turkish poet, is open for submissions. The competition and accompanying festival, held annually in the town of Cary, North Carolina, are proof that Nâzım Hikmet Ran, once a cult figure of the Communist world,...
Posted in Literature, News

Rewarding reads: November and December 2016

Orientalist aesthetics, Black Sea shipwrecks and refugees in space

By Emma Harper | January 5, 2017


In this blog series, we highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that weve read and listened to over the past month (or two, in this case). The Ottoman History Podcast began as a modest experiment in 2011, but has since grown into a vast digital resource...
Posted in Archaeology, Contemporary Art, History, News, Photography, Travel

Hawick remembers the horrors of Gallipoli

Tolga Örnek’s masterful documentary ‘Gallipoli’ screened at the Heart of Hawick cinema

By Julie Witford | December 23, 2016


The tragedy of the Gallipoli campaign was felt across the world, and not least in the small town of Hawick in the Scottish Borders. By the time the fighting had subsided in 1916, Hawick and the surrounding area had suffered 132 dead, 84 of them in one day alone. That infamous...
Posted in Film, History, News

Job opportunity: BIAA London Manager

Applications due January 7, 2017

By Cornucopia Arts Diary | December 20, 2016


The British Institute at Ankara (BIAA) is currently accepting applications for the position of London Manager. This opportunity may be a good fit for a Cornucopia reader, as the ideal candidate would have some knowledge of Turkey and the academic disciplines within the remit of the Institute. Founded in 1948,...
Posted in Archaeology, News

Candle, candle, burning bright

Cornucopia Marketplace is now selling handcrafted NYKS candles

By Emma Harper | December 16, 2016


A candle in the window is a favourite Christmas tradition of mine. There’s something about a flickering light that alleviates the winter doldrums. So as the days grew shorter in Istanbul, I found myself searching for candles to brighten up the dark nights. My hunt led me to NYKS, a...
Posted in Design, News, Shopping

A good neighbour

Elmgreen & Dragset announce the theme of the 15th Istanbul Biennial

By Emma Harper | December 7, 2016


Pinpointing the qualities of a good komşu (neighbour) is far from an exact science. It comes down to what an individual values: one person may prefer a neighbour who leaves them alone, while another wants someone to cook them food when they’re sick. The 15th Istanbul Biennial, curated by the...
Posted in Contemporary Art, News

Surprise finds in the Black Sea

Byzantine and Ottoman ships revealed in Bulgarian waters

By Roger Williams | November 26, 2016


This is a photogrammetric image (©EEF/Black Sea MAP) of The Flower of the Black Sea, an Ottoman ship that has been given her name because of the floral patterns found carved on her tiller. Nobody yet knows what she was carrying or where she was going when she sank off...
Posted in Archaeology, History, Nature, News

Rewarding reads: October 2016

Guest workers, Turkish humorists and Byzantine acoustics

By Emma Harper | November 21, 2016


‘Rewarding reads’ is a new feature on the Cornucopia blog. In this series, we highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that we've read over the past month. Kornelia Binicewicz is at it again, filing more gaps in the history of the Turkish music industry (she previously...
Posted in Books, Contemporary Art, Design, Exhibitions, History, Literature, Music and Performing Arts, News

Deadlines for research grants fast approaching

Last chance to apply for the Ancient & Modern Prize and the Research Scholarship at the British Institute at Ankara

By Emma Harper | October 26, 2016


Researchers, take note. There’s only a week or so left to apply for two grants awarded to individuals undertaking Turkey-related research. First up is the Ancient & Modern Prize, which is sponsored by Cornucopia magazine, HALI magazine and the three major London auction houses: Bonhams, Christie’s and Sotheby’s. The aim...
Posted in History, Islamic Art, News, Textiles

Weekend gallery guide: behind closed doors

Open Studio Days Istanbul allows the public to peek into the studios of local artists

By Emma Harper | October 6, 2016


No artist is an island. Open Studio Days Istanbul (Açık Stüdyo Günleri), which runs from October 7–9, makes certain of that. The three-day event creates an opportunity for the denizens of Istanbul to visit artists’ studios and non-commercial artist collectives that are normally off-limits. Artists directly connect not only with...
Posted in Contemporary Art, News

Rewarding reads: September 2016

Çatalhöyük finds, Thracian melodies and Tombili the cat (RIP)

By Emma Harper | October 5, 2016


‘Rewarding reads’ is a new feature on the Cornucopia blog. At the end of each month, we’ll highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that we read over the course of the month. In Discover magazine, Jennifer Hattam elucidates the new techniques utilised by archaeologists and researchers...
Posted in Archaeology, Contemporary Art, Exhibitions, History, Museums, News

The cream of the film festival crop

Wild woods, jobless Brits, slave rebellions and talking trees… Filmekimi is back with the best films from the festival circuit

By Emma Harper | September 30, 2016


It’s no Cannes or Sundance, but Filmekimi may be the next best thing. Unlike these major film festivals, or even the annual Istanbul Film Festival, with its focus on competitions for both foreign and local filmmakers, Filmekimi is more of a year-in-review. The programme almost exclusively features foreign films (this...
Posted in Film, News

Going big at the Venice Film Festival

Reha Erdem’s film ‘Big Big World’ wins the Special Orizzonti Jury Prize at the 73rd Venice Film Festival

By Emma Harper | September 13, 2016


Described by David Rooney of The Hollywood Reporter as ‘a thick Freudian soup of sibling love and parental denial’, Big Big World (Koca Dünya) – the only Turkish film in competition at the 73rd Venice Film Festival – certainly made an impact. Out of 32 films selected for the Horizons...
Posted in Film, News

The 2016 Talât Sait Halman Translation Award

IKSV is accepting submissions until November 4

By The Cornucopia Blog | August 16, 2016


Great translation, despite being incredibly difficult, often goes underappreciated.So we were delighted to learn that the 2016 Talât Sait Halman Translation Award is now accepting submissions. For the second year the Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts (IKSV) will be giving out this award in an effort to support outstanding...
Posted in Books, Literature, News
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