Rewarding reads: March and April 2017

A revealing relief, must-try Turkish dishes and the perfect day in Istanbul

By Emma Harper | April 26, 2017


In this blog series, we highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that we’ve read over the past month (or two, in this case). A relief uncovered by chance in eastern Anatolia has led archaeologists to revise the history of Harput, reports Hurriyet Daily News. Subsequent examinations...
Posted in Archaeology, Culinary Arts, Film, Music and Performing Arts, Obituaries

In memory of David French, intrepid explorer of Anatolia’s Roman roads

By David Barchard | March 25, 2017


David French, the former director of the British Institution at Ankara, who died on Friday (pictured right), was a leading figure in British archaeological research in Turkey for six decades. For just over a quarter of a century, he was Ankara Director of the Institute, then an exclusively archaeological body....
Posted in Archaeology, Obituaries

Rewarding reads: November and December 2016

Orientalist aesthetics, Black Sea shipwrecks and refugees in space

By Emma Harper | January 5, 2017


In this blog series, we highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that weve read and listened to over the past month (or two, in this case). The Ottoman History Podcast began as a modest experiment in 2011, but has since grown into a vast digital resource...
Posted in Archaeology, Contemporary Art, History, News, Photography, Travel

Job opportunity: BIAA London Manager

Applications due January 7, 2017

By Cornucopia Arts Diary | December 20, 2016


The British Institute at Ankara (BIAA) is currently accepting applications for the position of London Manager. This opportunity may be a good fit for a Cornucopia reader, as the ideal candidate would have some knowledge of Turkey and the academic disciplines within the remit of the Institute. Founded in 1948,...
Posted in Archaeology, News

Surprise finds in the Black Sea

Byzantine and Ottoman ships revealed in Bulgarian waters

By Roger Williams | November 26, 2016


This is a photogrammetric image (©EEF/Black Sea MAP) of The Flower of the Black Sea, an Ottoman ship that has been given her name because of the floral patterns found carved on her tiller. Nobody yet knows what she was carrying or where she was going when she sank off...
Posted in Archaeology, History, Nature, News

Aphrodisias: a pleasure garden unearthed

By Cornucopia | November 15, 2016


Andrew Wilson, Professor of the Archaeology of the Roman Empire at Oxford, will be speaking on Monday 28 November at Daunt Books in Marylebone High Street at 6.30 for 7 pm. His talk will focus on recent discoveries at the South Agora of Aphrodisias where he directs the archaeological work....
Posted in Archaeology, Fundraiser, Talks and Lectures

Designing humanity

The 3rd Istanbul Design Biennial aims high, but falls short

By Emma Harper | November 13, 2016


When the Transparent Man first visited Turkey in 1938, residents of Istanbul and Izmir flocked to see the life-sized model of a man whose transparent plastic skin reveals the secret interior of a human body: the spatial relationship between the organs and the skeleton, the snaking structures of the circulatory...
Posted in Archaeology, Design, Exhibitions

Rewarding reads: September 2016

Çatalhöyük finds, Thracian melodies and Tombili the cat (RIP)

By Emma Harper | October 5, 2016


‘Rewarding reads’ is a new feature on the Cornucopia blog. At the end of each month, we’ll highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that we read over the course of the month. In Discover magazine, Jennifer Hattam elucidates the new techniques utilised by archaeologists and researchers...
Posted in Archaeology, Contemporary Art, Exhibitions, History, Museums, News

Weekend gallery guide: grids, rings and a lost empire

What’s on in Istanbul over the weekend of September 3–4

By Emma Harper | September 1, 2016


Istanbul can feel a bit barren in the summer. That feeling was amplified this year by the constant construction in Beyoğlu and the shuttering of countless shops on İstiklâl Caddesi. Yet a few cultural institutions and galleries have kept their doors open and their spaces filled with art and artefacts....
Posted in Archaeology, Contemporary Art, Exhibitions, History, Photography

Calling young and old alike to apply for the 10th Ancient & Modern Research Prize

Applications due October 31, 2016

By Emma Harper | April 2, 2016


Have an idea for a research project related to things Turkish or textiles? Now is the time to put pen to paper and apply for the Ancient & Modern Prize, an award of £1,000 given to a candidate aged under 26 or over 60. Applications are open until October 31,...
Posted in Archaeology, Architecture, Culinary Arts, Design, History, Islamic Art, Literature, Textiles

Summer study in Istanbul: 2016 edition

Koç University offers language programmes and courses on the urban environment

By Emma Harper | March 20, 2016


Once summer rolls around, the make-up of Istanbul’s population shifts ever so slightly. While many residents decamp to summer houses and small villages to escape the heat and humidity, the city receives an influx of (mainly foreign) students who enrol in the various summer courses on offer. This year Koç...
Posted in Archaeology, History

Byzantine boon

By Emma Harper | December 8, 2015


You could say that a Byzantine Studies Research Center at Boğaziçi University has been a long time in the making. Alexander Van Millingen (1814–195), one of the first professors at Robert College, was a renowned scholar of Byzantine Constantinople and well known for his 1899 book Byzantine Constantinople: The Walls...
Posted in Archaeology, History, News

A journey through Anatolia’s forgotten empire

John Garstang and the 20th-century discovery of the Hittites

By Emma Harper | December 1, 2015


‘This is the notebook used by J.G. on his last trip in Turkey in 1951. I was wondering whether to throw it away, but it occurred to me that you might conceivably find some use for it in the Institute, so here it is. If you think it is no...
Posted in Archaeology, Exhibitions, History, Photography

The writing on the stone

‘A Gigantic Jigsaw Puzzle: The Epicurean Inscription of Diogenes of Oinoanda’

By Victoria Khroundina | April 16, 2015


Archaelogy lovers, this might be of interest. We received an email from Professor Martin Ferguson Smith via the Anglo-Turkish Society alerting us that a short film shot at the archaeological site of Oinoanda (close to Fethiye) is now available to watch on YouTube (where would we be without it). ‘Oinoanda’s...
Posted in Archaeology, History, News

Akram Zaatari at SALT

By Victoria Khroundina | January 22, 2015


SALT continues its survey of contemporary Lebanese artists (following the Rabih Mroué show last summer) with a comprehensive exhibition of the filmmaker, photographer, archival artist and curator, Akram Zaatari. One of the most important voices in Lebanon today, Zaatari – with more than 40 works and a dozen books under...
Posted in Archaeology, Contemporary Art, Exhibitions, Museums, Photography

The year that was…in pictures

By Victoria Khroundina | December 31, 2014


As 2014 comes to a close, I take a look at the year that was. In January, we announced that the Ancient & Modern award for original research has gone to Dr Peter Andrews (76), doyen of Asian tent studies, with Harriet Rix (23) taking the Godfrey Goodwin prize. Above,...
Posted in Archaeology, Architecture, Contemporary Art, Design, Exhibitions, Film, History, Museums, Nature, News, Gezi Protests, Photography, Sport

Gallery walkabout: Beyoğlu

The information age

By THE CORNUCOPIA BLOG | December 29, 2014


We are in Beyoğlu for our last gallery walk of 2014, with a diverse group of not-to-be-missed shows. On your walk, admire the pretty winter decorations on İstiklâl Caddesi. Turgut Yüksel, ‘Neo Abraham’, 2014, 100 x 93 cm TURGUT YÜKSEL’S THE CENTURY ON LOW HEAT Start at the Tünel end...
Posted in Archaeology, Architecture, Contemporary Art, Exhibitions, History, Museums

The RCAC announces new fellowships

By Victoria Khroundina | December 12, 2014


Earlier this week, the Research Centre for Anatolian Civilisations (RCAC) has announced a fresh batch of fellowship opportunities for the 2015–16 academic year. The overall aim of these fellowships is to develop and facilitate research projects that are concerned with the art, history, architecture and archaeology of civilisations of Turkey....
Posted in Archaeology, Architecture, History, Islamic Art, News

Ancient & Modern Research Prize 2014–15

By THE CORNUCOPIA BLOG | October 9, 2014


Entries are now open for Ancient & Modern, a scholarship for original research sponsored by Cornucopia and Halı magazines, and by Bonhams, Christie’s and Sotheby’s. The ninth (2014/15) grant of £1,000 for a research project will be awarded to a candidate less than twenty-six or over sixty years of age....
Posted in Archaeology, Architecture, Culinary Arts, History, Islamic Art, News

Looking for Hadrian

By Victoria Khroundina | August 22, 2014


Earlier this month excavations began at the 2,500-year-old city of Kyzikos, in Balıkesir, northwest Turkey. The prize in sight? A relief of Hadrian. Speaking to Hürriyet Daily News last week, Nurettin Koçhan, in charge of the excavations and an associate professor at the archaeology department of Atatürk University, said that...
Posted in Archaeology, News
Current Events