Rewarding reads: March and April 2017

A revealing relief, must-try Turkish dishes and the perfect day in Istanbul

By Emma Harper | April 26, 2017


In this blog series, we highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that we’ve read over the past month (or two, in this case). A relief uncovered by chance in eastern Anatolia has led archaeologists to revise the history of Harput, reports Hurriyet Daily News. Subsequent examinations...
Posted in Archaeology, Culinary Arts, Film, Music and Performing Arts, Obituaries

Rewarding reads: January 2017

Magical snow, sweet-and-sour pomegranate molasses and Turkish fairy tales

By Emma Harper | February 22, 2017


In this blog series, we highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that weve read over the past month. ‘Snow in Istanbul always feels magical,’ writes Tim Arango in The New York Times. He documents how last month’s blizzard, the heaviest snowfall in Istanbul since 2009, came as...
Posted in Books, Culinary Arts, History, News, Orientalism, Travel

Betting on Beyoğlu

Hacer Sayman is breathing new life into a Beyoğlu side street with her design boutique, antique shop and café

By Emma Harper | December 13, 2016


Hacer Sayman has a soft spot for neglected buildings. In a city like Istanbul, where historic structures are more likely to be demolished and replicated than conserved, her willingness to pour money into restoration projects is something of an anomaly. But it has served the community well: the beautiful old...
Posted in Architecture, Culinary Arts, Design, Fine Art, Islamic Art, Shopping

All eyes on the humble olive

Inaugural Slow Food-organised event in Ayvalık takes a deep dive into the history, culture and ecology of the olive

By Jennifer Hattam | April 22, 2016


‘Turkey is not really an olive oil country.’ It seemed a strange thing to say at an event hosted in Turkey and dedicated to the world of olives. ‘So why are we meeting here?’ one international participant whispered after the Turkish academic Artun Ünsal made his declaration on the first...
Posted in Culinary Arts, Nature, News

Calling young and old alike to apply for the 10th Ancient & Modern Research Prize

Applications due October 31, 2016

By Emma Harper | April 2, 2016


Have an idea for a research project related to things Turkish or textiles? Now is the time to put pen to paper and apply for the Ancient & Modern Prize, an award of £1,000 given to a candidate aged under 26 or over 60. Applications are open until October 31,...
Posted in Archaeology, Architecture, Culinary Arts, Design, History, Islamic Art, Literature, Textiles

Turkey gets Aussie-fied

By Victoria Khroundina | August 31, 2015


From next month until December, events continue as part of the ‘Australia in Turkey 2015’ festival. The biggest celebration of Australian culture in Turkey to date, it aims to enhance social and cultural understanding between the two countries. That it’s being celebrated in the same year as the centenary of...
Posted in Contemporary Art, Culinary Arts, Design, Exhibitions, Film, History, Modern Art, Music and Performing Arts, News

Dreaming of Mardin

By Tara Alisbah | October 10, 2014


Four years ago, about four months after I’d arrived in Turkey, I went to Mardin for a slightly trumped up work visit. I was researching NGOs serving at-risk children and youth, and I could have gone to any city in Turkey, but Mardin had been calling to me ever since...
Posted in Culinary Arts, History, Literature, Travel

Ancient & Modern Research Prize 2014–15

By THE CORNUCOPIA BLOG | October 9, 2014


Entries are now open for Ancient & Modern, a scholarship for original research sponsored by Cornucopia and Halı magazines, and by Bonhams, Christie’s and Sotheby’s. The ninth (2014/15) grant of £1,000 for a research project will be awarded to a candidate less than twenty-six or over sixty years of age....
Posted in Archaeology, Architecture, Culinary Arts, History, Islamic Art, News

Pando Kaymak faces possible closure

By Victoria Khroundina | August 12, 2014


We were sad to hear news that a Beşiktaş institution – well, an Istanbul institution – faces closure. Pando Kaymak, a favourite breakfast spot that makes its venerable kaymak (clotted cream) on the premises has been given an eviction notice, as reported by Culinary Backstreets on Friday. The café – featured...
Posted in Culinary Arts, News

TCF Fellowships

Applications now open

By THE CORNUCOPIA BLOG | April 23, 2014


A good thing to keep in the back of the mind is the Turkish Cultural Foundation’s (TCF) fellowship programme. There are two types: the Fellowship in Turkish Culture and Art and the Cultural Exchange Fellowship.  The TCF Fellowship in Turkish Culture and Art has provided funding to young and established scholars since...
Posted in Contemporary Art, Culinary Arts, Design, Film, Fine Art, History, Islamic Art, Literature, Museums, Music and Performing Arts, News

Istanbul’s little shop of horrors

By Victoria Khroundina | April 5, 2014


Day by day, Istanbul looks more and more like a giant construction playground than a city whose history dates back 1500 years. With ever more narcissistic projects signed off by the bulldozer-happy Prime Minister Erdoğan, it is becoming increasingly hard to keep track of exactly what is going and what is...
Posted in Architecture, Culinary Arts, History, News, Gezi Protests

Middle Eastern Studies under the spotlight

The Fourth World Congress for Middle Eastern Studies

By Victoria Khroundina | January 3, 2014


The Fourth World Congress for Middle Eastern Studies (WOCMES), touted as ‘the most important global event in Middle Eastern studies in 2014’ will take place at the Middle East Technical University (METU) in Ankara between August 18th and 22nd, 2014. Organised in collaboration between the METU and the Turkish Social...
Posted in Culinary Arts, Design, Film, Fine Art, History, Islamic Art, Literature, Music and Performing Arts, News

The year that was…

By Victoria Khroundina | December 30, 2013


With just a few days left of 2013, it’s time to look back on the year that was.  The year 2013 will be etched in history as the year of the Gezi protests. It all started with a tree, so to speak, in late May when a group of people...
Posted in Architecture, Contemporary Art, Culinary Arts, Design, Exhibitions, Film, History, Museums, Music and Performing Arts, Protest Music, Nature, News, Gezi Protests, Photography, Sport

Gearing up for an icy winter

After a hot summer, the solidarity protests continue

By Victoria Khroundina | December 23, 2013


After weeks of preparations and permissions sought (and granted) from local municipalities, the day of the solidarity march was finally upon us. Yesterday (December 22) thousands of people came together in Kadıköy to protest the urban politics of the government. Environmentalists, archaeologists, historians, architects, ecologists, women’s movements, LGBT movements, human...
Posted in Architecture, Culinary Arts, History, News, Gezi Protests

Salvaging Istanbul’s remaining treasures

Solidarity march on December 22

By Victoria Khroundina | December 17, 2013


Enough is enough. This Sunday December 22 the people of Istanbul will ‘reclaim their city’. The brainchild of a number of organisations, movements and forums (some notable ones include Istanbul Urban Movements, Defence of the Northern Forests, Abbasağa Forum, Archaeologists’ Association Istanbul Branch, People’s Engineers and Architects, Istanbul Assembly for...
Posted in Architecture, Culinary Arts, History, News, Gezi Protests

A win for Gümüşdere

By Victoria Khroundina | December 2, 2013


We at Cornucopia were delighted to receive an email from Beyhan Uzunçarşılı last week giving news that Gümüşdere is no longer under threat from ISKI, the city’s water supply and sanitation administrator, building a water-treatment plant that would destroy hectares and hectares of land, and put the area’s agricultural livelihood...
Posted in Culinary Arts, History, News

Some good, old-fashioned advice

16th-century remedies for ailing plants: a workshop with Aleksandar Shopov

By Victoria Khroundina | September 8, 2013


A small but attentive group gathered in the beautiful bostan (garden) behind the Belgrade Church in Yedikule (above) last Sunday (September 1) to hear a talk on 16th-century remedies for ailing plants by Aleksandar Shopov – the PhD candidate at Harvard University who has spent the last month or so...
Posted in Culinary Arts, History, News

Fight for survival: help save the forests

Northern Forests Defence Camp

By CORNUCOPIA BLOG | September 6, 2013


The bid to save the ‘lungs of Istanbul’ – the city’s northern forests – continues. An initiative calling itself the Northern Forest Defence is organising a two-day camp this weekend (September 7 and 8) at a campsite in the coastal village of Riva in Beykoz (above) on the Black Sea. Don’t be...
Posted in Culinary Arts, History, News

Casting an expert eye on the Yedikule bostans

Archaeobotany workshop with Dr Chantel White

By Victoria Khroundina | August 17, 2013


Cornucopia’s editor John Scott gave his keen observations of last Wednesday’s archaeobotany workshop at Yedikule bostans (gardens) with Dr Chantel White in yesterday’s blog. Today I will take you through Chantel’s own observations. The area of the Yedikule gardens marked on a map of Istanbul A bit of background: the...
Posted in Culinary Arts, History, News, Talks and Lectures

Seeds of discontent

By Victoria Khroundina | August 8, 2013


Last Sunday I was invited to do iftar (the Ramazan evening breakfast) with a very special community – part of a solidarity event being held for the farmers of Gümüşdere in their village on the Black Sea (beyond Sarıyer, on the European side of the Bosphorus, at the northernmost point...
Posted in Culinary Arts, News
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