Extract

Along the Lycian Way

After years of walking through some of the most important countryside along the Turkish Mediterranean, a lone English woman has documented a networkof ancient roads and mountain paths that once linked the cities of ancient Lycia.

Kate Clow abandoned her life as a London computer consultant, and is now helping to foment a rural revolution in Turkey, indirectly challenging the army, the government and even the bank that awarded her top prize in a prestigious environmental contest.

Clow has painstakingly mapped a 250km route from Fethiye, the ancient Telmessos, to the city of Antalya, where she herself now lives. It follows the ancient, cobbled roads, goat trails and paths that are used by nomadic herdsmen. It also covers more than a millennium of human history, passing graves dating from 700BC and unexcavated Byzantine monasteries from 800AD. To walk the whole route at a single stretch takes just under six weeks.

To read the full article, purchase Issue 15

Issue 15, 1998 Mountain Secrets
£12.00 / $15.79 / 100.06 TL
Other Highlights from Cornucopia 15
  • Some corner of a foreign land

    On the Great Lake of the Catherine Palace at Tsarskoye Selo, outside St Petersburg, stands this peaceful Turkish bath, an ironic legacy of a century of intermittent warfare

  • The Primrose Path

    In the garden we may take them for granted, but in the wild, their colours make the heart sing. Andrew Byfield celebrates the vibrant beauty of Turkey’s primulas.


  • The Noble Heart

    A glorious thistle, the globe artichoke merits better than the usual simple boiling, especially if it is the giant Turkish globe, with its huge mouth-watering centre. Berrin Torolsan reveals how to do it justice


  • Home is where the yurt is

    Out of sight of the sea, high above Göcek Marina at Huzur Yadisi, another green peace prevails. In a hidden valley, Richard Tredennick-Titchen found an encampment of yurts that dramatically changed his life.


  • Four men and a snowcock

    One of Turkey’s finest birds is the grouse-like Caspian snowcock. To find it takes some organising, for it lives way above the summer pastures in remote areas such as the Aladaglar, the highest part of the Taurus Mountains.

  • The Holy Mountain

    Ottoman Athos unveiled: an unprecedented portrait of the glorious backdrop to a thousand years of unworldly devotion and Byzantine intrigue, By Anthony Bryer, with photographs by Graham Speake



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Issue 15, 1998 Mountain Secrets
£12.00 / $15.79 / 100.06 TL
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