Extract

Adventures in Istanbul

Life in the Sixties

There was never a dull moment growing up in the British Consulate in Sixties Istanbul. Griselda Warr selects photographs from her mother Gillian’s album and tells tales of shooting stars, benign espionage and a call girl wronged

  • Copper Street, Kapalıçarşı (Gillian Warr 1963)

My mother’s excited reaction to our time in Istanbul shines out of every page of her letters: ‘It was a blissful morning unlike any other I’ve known.’ It seems that every day offered a new adventure, which my parents jumped into, even as they balanced all the work and social obligations required at the massive British Consulate. My parents, Michael and Gillian Warr, had arrived in Istanbul by ship in 1962 for my father’s new job as British consul general. With them were their two daughters, myself, aged 10, Eleanor, aged six, and our 18-year-old cousin Rupert, in the role of nanny. In true English fashion, my elder brothers, George and David, at boarding school and college in England, joined us for the holidays. We were to live in Istanbul in 1967, and each of us remembers those five years as a fascinating adventure.

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Good places to stay
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Issue 44, 2010 Classics with a Twist
£8.00 / $10.54 / 39.09 TL
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