Demolition by night

The historic Karaköy Passenger Terminal is the latest victim of the Galataport project

By Emma Harper | February 17, 2017


The photos and footage shared on Thursday night by Facebook user Togan Tong were grainy but unmistakable: the Karaköy Yolcu Salonu (Passenger Terminal), an important work of Turkish architecture from the early Republican era, was being torn down. The online newspaper Diken reports that the sea-facing side of the terminal...
Posted in Architecture, News

Weekend gallery guide: mirror images, depopulated desert and sculpted velvet

Istanbul this weekend (February 18–19)

By Emma Harper | February 16, 2017


This weekend we reflect on three spectacular solo shows. All are located in and around Beyoğlu (two in the same building – Mısır Apartment, on İstiklâl Caddesi). An Astronomical Determination of the Distance Between Two Cities, Heba Y Amin's second solo show at Galeri Zilberman, ends on Saturday, and Mirror,...
Posted in Contemporary Art, Exhibitions

Weekend gallery guide: water worries and flight paths

Istanbul this weekend (February 11–12)

By Emma Harper | February 9, 2017


With its tall circular tower and redbrick façade, the palatial Perili Köşk in Rumelihisarı is a beacon on the Bosphorus. Its interior is equally eye-catching. Home to the corporate headquarters of Borusan Holding, the building doubles as a contemporary art gallery at the weekend. Temporary exhibitions occupy two gallery spaces,...
Posted in Contemporary Art, Museums, Photography

The restless sightseer: a winter’s day in Kayseri

By Francis Russell | February 3, 2017


Kayseri has changed dramatically in the last quarter century. Seljuk tombs that used to seem almost in the country are now dominated by modern buildings and the great monuments round the much restored citadel are overlooked by towering blocks, including the Hilton and Radisson hotels. It was to the latter...

Weekend gallery guide: green thumbs, hazy memories and profound portraits

Istanbul this weekend (February 4–5)

By Emma Harper | February 2, 2017


The large-scale, well-curated exhibitions currently on view in Istanbul – Feyhaman Duran: Between Two Worlds at the Sabancı Museum, The Characters of Yusuf Franko at ANAMED and Harbour at Istanbul Modern come to mind – are full-day events. But sometimes you want your art in more manageable portions. So this...
Posted in Contemporary Art, Exhibitions

The cat’s whiskers

The Istanbul cat documentary ‘Kedi’ will be released in select US and Canadian cities

By Emma Harper | January 24, 2017


One night last summer I came home to my Istanbul apartment to find my burly, bearded neighbour seated on the front stairs, a young street cat nestled in his arms. He explained how he had noticed her skulking around the back garden in search of food. The cat had a...
Posted in Film

‘The eye of the painter sees best’

The landmark exhibition ‘Feyhaman Duran: Between Two Worlds’ opens at the Sakıp Sabancı Museum

By Emma Harper | January 18, 2017


Surveying the life of Feyhaman Duran – one of Turkey’s most beloved painters and the father of Turkish portraiture – it’s clear the artist had many admirable attributes: he valued integrity above financial gain, practised moderation and treated his students at the Academy of Fine Arts with kindness and respect....
Posted in Exhibitions, History, Modern Art

A parade of poets

Submissions for the 9th Nâzim Hikmet Poetry Competition due January 15

By Emma Harper | January 10, 2017


Calling all poets: the 9th Nâzim Hikmet Poetry Competition, organised as a tribute to the pre-eminent Turkish poet, is open for submissions. The competition and accompanying festival, held annually in the town of Cary, North Carolina, are proof that Nâzım Hikmet Ran, once a cult figure of the Communist world,...
Posted in Literature, News

Rewarding reads: November and December 2016

Orientalist aesthetics, Black Sea shipwrecks and refugees in space

By Emma Harper | January 5, 2017


In this blog series, we highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that we've read and listened to over the past month (or two, in this case). The Ottoman History Podcast began as a modest experiment in 2011, but has since grown into a vast digital resource...
Posted in Archaeology, Contemporary Art, History, News, Photography, Travel

Hawick remembers the horrors of Gallipoli

Tolga Örnek’s masterful documentary ‘Gallipoli’ screened at the Heart of Hawick cinema

By Julie Witford | December 23, 2016


The tragedy of the Gallipoli campaign was felt across the world, and not least in the small town of Hawick in the Scottish Borders. By the time the fighting had subsided in 1916, Hawick and the surrounding area had suffered 132 dead, 84 of them in one day alone. That infamous...
Posted in Film, History, News

Job opportunity: BIAA London Manager

Applications due January 7, 2017

By Cornucopia Arts Diary | December 20, 2016


The British Institute at Ankara (BIAA) is currently accepting applications for the position of London Manager. This opportunity may be a good fit for a Cornucopia reader, as the ideal candidate would have some knowledge of Turkey and the academic disciplines within the remit of the Institute. Founded in 1948,...
Posted in Archaeology, News

Candle, candle, burning bright

Cornucopia Marketplace is now selling handcrafted NYKS candles

By Emma Harper | December 16, 2016


A candle in the window is a favourite Christmas tradition of mine. There’s something about a flickering light that alleviates the winter doldrums. So as the days grew shorter in Istanbul, I found myself searching for candles to brighten up the dark nights. My hunt led me to NYKS, a...
Posted in Design, News, Shopping

Betting on Beyoğlu

Hacer Sayman is breathing new life into a Beyoğlu side street with her design boutique, antique shop and café

By Emma Harper | December 13, 2016


Hacer Sayman has a soft spot for neglected buildings. In a city like Istanbul, where historic structures are more likely to be demolished and replicated than conserved, her willingness to pour money into restoration projects is something of an anomaly. But it has served the community well: the beautiful old...
Posted in Architecture, Culinary Arts, Design, Fine Art, Islamic Art, Shopping

A good neighbour

Elmgreen & Dragset announce the theme of the 15th Istanbul Biennial

By Emma Harper | December 7, 2016


Pinpointing the qualities of a good komşu (neighbour) is far from an exact science. It comes down to what an individual values: one person may prefer a neighbour who leaves them alone, while another wants someone to cook them food when they’re sick. The 15th Istanbul Biennial, curated by the...
Posted in Contemporary Art, News

Deck the halls

Get in the festive spirit at one of Istanbul’s holiday markets

By Emma Harper | November 30, 2016


The holiday season is upon us, which in Istanbul means preparations for the New Year. Conveniently, Yılbaşı (New Year) celebrations in Turkey have all the trappings of Christmas, including decorated fir trees, turkey dinners and even gifts from Noel Baba (Father Noel, otherwise known as Santa Claus). Another Christmas tradition...
Posted in Fundraiser, Shopping

Surprise finds in the Black Sea

Byzantine and Ottoman ships revealed in Bulgarian waters

By Roger Williams | November 26, 2016


This is a photogrammetric image (©EEF/Black Sea MAP) of The Flower of the Black Sea, an Ottoman ship that has been given her name because of the floral patterns found carved on her tiller. Nobody yet knows what she was carrying or where she was going when she sank off...
Posted in Archaeology, History, Nature, News

Weekend gallery guide: the rise and fall of Istanbul’s street dogs

Istanbul this weekend (November 26–27)

By Emma Harper | November 24, 2016


When the French writer Théophile Gautier first arrived in Istanbul in the mid-19th century he chose a large pit in the middle of the street as his reference point. What was so memorable about this pit? At the bottom of it, ‘a large, aggressive dog was suckling her pups in...
Posted in Exhibitions, History, Photography

Rewarding reads: October 2016

Guest workers, Turkish humorists and Byzantine acoustics

By Emma Harper | November 21, 2016


‘Rewarding reads’ is a new feature on the Cornucopia blog. In this series, we highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that we've read over the past month. Kornelia Binicewicz is at it again, filing more gaps in the history of the Turkish music industry (she previously...
Posted in Books, Contemporary Art, Design, Exhibitions, History, Literature, Music and Performing Arts, News

Aphrodisias: a pleasure garden unearthed

By Cornucopia | November 15, 2016


Andrew Wilson, Professor of the Archaeology of the Roman Empire at Oxford, will be speaking on Monday 28 November at Daunt Books in Marylebone High Street at 6.30 for 7 pm. His talk will focus on recent discoveries at the South Agora of Aphrodisias where he directs the archaeological work....
Posted in Archaeology, Fundraiser, Talks and Lectures

The snowman cometh

By Tony Barrell | November 15, 2016


An exciting new piece of music receives its world premiere this Thursday, November 17. A lucky audience in London will be the first to hear The Snowman Rhapsody, composed by Howard Blake. The rhapsody is a major elaboration on the composer’s much-loved music for The Snowman – now a widely...
Posted in Fundraiser, Music and Performing Arts, Jazz
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