Periot piece… plus ça change

By Jason Goodwin | March 26, 2017


There’s an app on my daughter’s phone which distorts faces, pulls them round, to give people Habsburg chins or googly eyes or enormous teeth, writes Jason Goodwin (portrait by Monica Fritz). It’s amusing enough, but it isn’t really very illuminating. It merely makes monsters of us all, unlike Yusuf Bey’s...
Posted in Books, Exhibitions

In memory of David French, intrepid explorer of Anatolia’s Roman roads

By David Barchard | March 25, 2017


David French, the former director of the British Institution at Ankara who died on Friday (pictured right), was a leading figure in British archaeological research in Turkey for six decades. For just over a quarter of a century, he was Ankara director or the Institute, then an exclusively archaeological body....
Posted in Archaeology, Obituaries

Gender-bending bards

The women changing Turkey’s music scene

By Ezgi Üstündağ | March 24, 2017


Few Turkish words conjure up a scene as swiftly and uniformly as ozan. The noun is seemingly inseparable from the image of an elderly minstrel, bağlama in hand, singing of his travels before an audience of Anatolian villagers. Significant, too, is that this widespread understanding of the ozan, the lone...
Posted in Music and Performing Arts, Jazz, Protest Music

Rewarding reads: February 2017

Celebrities in Cappadocia, prefab chalets and poorly puppies

By Emma Harper | March 18, 2017


In this blog series, we highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that we’ve read over the past month. ‘I never thought I’d be saying this, but I’m a big fan of Martha Stewart’, writes Robert Ousterhout in a delightful post for the Penn History of Art...
Posted in Architecture, Books, History, Literature, Music and Performing Arts, News

The smiling Orientalist

An Anglo-Turkish moment: JF Lewis’s portrait (almost certainly) of the great Egyptologist Sir John Gardner Wilkinson

By John Scott | March 17, 2017


This witty portrait by the Orientalist painter John Frederick Lewis can be found this weekend at BADA, the British Antique Dealers’ Association’s annual fair in Chelsea (March 15–21). In Guy Peppiatt Fine Art’s catalogue notes, the art historian and JF Lewis-expert Briony Llewellyn describes the sitter in Turkish costume as...

Looking back from London

The Book Fair returns to the classics

By Roger Williams | March 14, 2017


The London Book Fair opened today with Poland as the ‘Market Focus’ country, and trade looked brisk. The behemoth publishing houses occupied centre stage with vast stands and clients checking in for their appointment. Better to wander around the edge of Olympia’s Exhibition Halls to find publishers less susceptible to...
Posted in Books, News, Shopping

Istanbul galleries sweep into Dubai

The 11th edition of Art Dubai opens on March 15

By Emma Harper | March 9, 2017


Three Istanbul galleries – Galerist, Galeri Zilberman and Sanatorium – will participate in the 11th edition of Art Dubai, an international art fair highlighting works from the Middle East, Africa and South Asia. Under the leadership of its new director, Myrna Ayad, the fair is presenting its strongest programme to...
Posted in Contemporary Art, Modern Art, News

Sounding off

Cevdet Erek prepares his site-specific sound installation for the 57th Venice Biennale

By Emma Harper | March 2, 2017


Even though Istanbul is one of the worst cities in the world for noise pollution, the sounds of the city are as much of a joy as they are a nuisance – they evoke a sense of place. Istanbul would not be Istanbul without the long, low horns of container...
Posted in Contemporary Art, Exhibitions, News

Rewarding reads: January 2017

Magical snow, sweet-and-sour pomegranate molasses and Turkish fairy tales

By Emma Harper | February 22, 2017


In this blog series, we highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that weve read over the past month. ‘Snow in Istanbul always feels magical,’ writes Tim Arango in The New York Times. He documents how last month’s blizzard, the heaviest snowfall in Istanbul since 2009, came as...
Posted in Books, Culinary Arts, History, News, Orientalism, Travel

Demolition by night

The historic Karaköy Passenger Terminal is the latest victim of the Galataport project

By Emma Harper | February 17, 2017


The photos and footage shared on Thursday night by Facebook user Togan Tong were grainy but unmistakable: the Karaköy Yolcu Salonu (Passenger Terminal), an important work of Turkish architecture from the early Republican era, was being torn down. The online newspaper Diken reports that the sea-facing side of the terminal...
Posted in Architecture, News

Weekend gallery guide: mirror images, depopulated desert and sculpted velvet

Istanbul this weekend (February 18–19)

By Emma Harper | February 16, 2017


This weekend we reflect on three spectacular solo shows. All are located in and around Beyoğlu (two in the same building – Mısır Apartment, on İstiklâl Caddesi). An Astronomical Determination of the Distance Between Two Cities, Heba Y Amin's second solo show at Galeri Zilberman, ends on Saturday, and Mirror,...
Posted in Contemporary Art, Exhibitions

Weekend gallery guide: water worries and flight paths

Istanbul this weekend (February 11–12)

By Emma Harper | February 9, 2017


With its tall circular tower and redbrick façade, the palatial Perili Köşk in Rumelihisarı is a beacon on the Bosphorus. Its interior is equally eye-catching. Home to the corporate headquarters of Borusan Holding, the building doubles as a contemporary art gallery at the weekend. Temporary exhibitions occupy two gallery spaces,...
Posted in Contemporary Art, Museums, Photography

The restless sightseer: a winter’s day in Kayseri

By Francis Russell | February 3, 2017


Kayseri has changed dramatically in the last quarter century. Seljuk tombs that used to seem almost in the country are now dominated by modern buildings and the great monuments round the much restored citadel are overlooked by towering blocks, including the Hilton and Radisson hotels. It was to the latter...

Weekend gallery guide: green thumbs, hazy memories and profound portraits

Istanbul this weekend (February 4–5)

By Emma Harper | February 2, 2017


The large-scale, well-curated exhibitions currently on view in Istanbul – Feyhaman Duran: Between Two Worlds at the Sabancı Museum, The Characters of Yusuf Franko at ANAMED and Harbour at Istanbul Modern come to mind – are full-day events. But sometimes you want your art in more manageable portions. So this...
Posted in Contemporary Art, Exhibitions

The cat’s whiskers

The Istanbul cat documentary ‘Kedi’ will be released in select US and Canadian cities

By Emma Harper | January 24, 2017


One night last summer I came home to my Istanbul apartment to find my burly, bearded neighbour seated on the front stairs, a young street cat nestled in his arms. He explained how he had noticed her skulking around the back garden in search of food. The cat had a...
Posted in Film

‘The eye of the painter sees best’

The landmark exhibition ‘Feyhaman Duran: Between Two Worlds’ opens at the Sakıp Sabancı Museum

By Emma Harper | January 18, 2017


Surveying the life of Feyhaman Duran – one of Turkey’s most beloved painters and the father of Turkish portraiture – it’s clear the artist had many admirable attributes: he valued integrity above financial gain, practised moderation and treated his students at the Academy of Fine Arts with kindness and respect....
Posted in Exhibitions, History, Modern Art

A parade of poets

Submissions for the 9th Nâzim Hikmet Poetry Competition due January 15

By Emma Harper | January 10, 2017


Calling all poets: the 9th Nâzim Hikmet Poetry Competition, organised as a tribute to the pre-eminent Turkish poet, is open for submissions. The competition and accompanying festival, held annually in the town of Cary, North Carolina, are proof that Nâzım Hikmet Ran, once a cult figure of the Communist world,...
Posted in Literature, News

Rewarding reads: November and December 2016

Orientalist aesthetics, Black Sea shipwrecks and refugees in space

By Emma Harper | January 5, 2017


In this blog series, we highlight some of our favourite Turkey-related articles and news titbits that weve read and listened to over the past month (or two, in this case). The Ottoman History Podcast began as a modest experiment in 2011, but has since grown into a vast digital resource...
Posted in Archaeology, Contemporary Art, History, News, Photography, Travel

Hawick remembers the horrors of Gallipoli

Tolga Örnek’s masterful documentary ‘Gallipoli’ screened at the Heart of Hawick cinema

By Julie Witford | December 23, 2016


The tragedy of the Gallipoli campaign was felt across the world, and not least in the small town of Hawick in the Scottish Borders. By the time the fighting had subsided in 1916, Hawick and the surrounding area had suffered 132 dead, 84 of them in one day alone. That infamous...
Posted in Film, History, News

Job opportunity: BIAA London Manager

Applications due January 7, 2017

By Cornucopia Arts Diary | December 20, 2016


The British Institute at Ankara (BIAA) is currently accepting applications for the position of London Manager. This opportunity may be a good fit for a Cornucopia reader, as the ideal candidate would have some knowledge of Turkey and the academic disciplines within the remit of the Institute. Founded in 1948,...
Posted in Archaeology, News
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