Issue 31, 2004

China’s Wild West

£15.00 / $19.21 / 68.73 TL
($/TL approx)

The Turks of China – travels in the land of the Uighur. The Caliph’s daughter: Cecil Beaton’s fairytale princess. The doorman’s son who saved the empire; dazzling flora of the high Taurus; vintage Cappadocia. Plus: truffles, the cook’s best friend

Highlights

  • Black Diamonds

    Though Turkish truffles resemble their more famous European cousins in appearance, their fragrance – mellow and delicately fruity – is far milder.
    More cookery features

  • Vintage Cappadocia

    Is this fantastic landscape about to become the new hotspot for wine-lovers? In Cornucopia 31 Kevin Gould heads for the oldest vineyards on earth to find out. Photographs by Frits Meyst

  • The Doorman’s Son who Saved the Empire

    Born into penury, he rose to be revered across Europe. Yet the Ottoman Empire’s youngest ever grand vizier is all but forgotten at home. David Barchard charts the dramatic career of the master strategist Âli Pasha

  • Along the Rocky Road

    When spring arrives in the high passes of the Taurus Mountains, a dazzling display of flowers comes out to greet it. Story and photographs by Martyn Rix

  • The Caliph’s Daughter

    Her life is the stuff of fairy tales. Omar Khalidi tells the story of the princess who captivated Cecil Beaton

  • The Turks of China

    Xinjiang, formerly known as Chinese Turkestan, is home to some ten million people of Turkic descent. Their culture, language and religious beliefs still owe more to central Asia and the northern steppes than they do to China itself. As distant from the China Sea as it is from the Mediterranean, Xinjiang is a place of wild terrain and extreme climate, surrounded by high mountain ranges. By Christian Tyler

Inside the issue

Books

  1. Silk: 13th to 18th Centuries, treasures from the Museum of Islamic Art, Qatar. Reviewed by Phillippa Scott
  2. Sketches of Turkey in 1831 and 1832, by James Ellsworth de Kay. Reviewed by David Barchard
  3. Peak of Perception, by Anthony Bryer. [available online]
  4. Bathtime Reading, by Christopher Trillo. [available online]
  5. Tastes of Byzantium, by Andrew Dalby. Reviewed by Charles Perry. [available online]

Regulars

  1. Connoisseur
    Byzantium at the Met, 300 years of fashion in Istanbul, and the golden Cup of Imbros
  2. Private View, by Andrew Finkel
  3. Trade Secrets
    The porcelain doctor, by Berrin Torolsan
  4. Village Voices, by Azize Ethem
  5. City Life
    Restaurants by Andrew Finkel, Hettie Judah on the new wine lists, and Ateş Orga on the cream of music festivals
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Issue 31, 2004
£15.00 / $19.21 / 68.73 TL
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